Indoor Cycling Classes in the Off-Season

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Keep It Real

Have you ever considered doing indoor cycling classes as a way to stay conditioned and improve your cycling performance in the off-season?  We brought in indoor cycling expert, Jennifer Sage to discuss this option and why our listeners might be interested.

Jennifer  has a degree in Exercise Science and is a Certified Personal Trainer, and Certified Strength and Conditioning Specialist.  As an avid cyclist, she raced mountain bikes, and rode her bike across Europe and around New Zealand on self-supported thousand-mile bicycle adventures. Jennifer endeavors to bring the outdoors inside in her indoor cycling classes, providing realistic, effective yet fun and entertaining profiles for her students.

Join us on this podcast about indoor cycling and find out about:

  • The difference between cycling on a trainer and taking indoor cycling classes
  • Do you need Indoor Cycling Shoes?
  • The biomechanics of pedaling with a weighted flywheel and the huge implications it has on training techniques, cadence and pedal stroke
  • Which techniques are applicable to outdoor riding and which techniques cyclists should sit out
  • How to select your gear or hill (resistance) and your cadence to best simulate what you do outside, adhering to the rules of “specificity of training”
  • Popular movements that all cyclists (and non-cyclists alike) should avoid in IDC classes, and why
  • How to increase your climbing skills and strength indoors
  • How to improve your endurance and aerobic base
  • How to periodize your program using indoor cycling classes
  • A comparison of heart rate training zone methodologies and how to choose which one works best for your specific goals
  • Drills for IDC classes to optimize your technique
  • High intensity interval profiles to maximize your performance
  • And many more tips on how to make the most of indoor cycling classes

Check out the Book we talked about on the podcast. “Keep it Real”

Keepitreal bookKeep it Real in Your Indoor Cycling Classes is a must-read for both cyclists and indoor cycling instructors alike. Many well-meaning instructors would like to be able to cater to their cycling clientele but they may not know what the specific needs of a cyclist are.item7
Instructors! Everything you need to know about keeping your classes relevant to cycling is in this eBook!
Additional Links:

Indoor Cycling Association 

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Comments

  1. Thanks for having Jennifer Sage on your podcast. She is one of our “niche industry’s” best spokesperson. That niche is Cycling-Specific Indoor Cycling. I’ve been pouring my time, energy and money into seeing this niche grow for 5 years now, and it is not unlike rolling a giant bolder up-hill. The cycling community has not had a good experience indoors for so many years that most will not even consider it. In fact, even still towards the end of the broadcast Victor said that “It’s hard to like anything with the words ‘Indoor Cycling’ in it”.

    Jennifer mentioned Tom Scotto – and I agree, he is probably the best indoor cycling instructor in the U.S. and he is my partner. Together we created the first Cycling-Specific certification for Indoor Cycling Instructors – your readers/listeners can find out more about this at Cycling Fusion’s web site.

    Victor mentioned that there is a lot more about Indoor Cycling, and Jennifer will tell you, we have some of the most advanced technology and most cycling specific program in the world, and I would love to tell your listeners about it. Most cyclists have no idea how good it can be and how many resources there are out there.

    • Gene

      Thanks for the comment. We would love to have you on the show to help us and our listeners learn how to use indoor cycling classes to help their outdoor riding. Thanks for chiming it we really appreciate it. Victor

  2. Andy Turner says:

    Quick question to Victor
    I have found a local indoor cycling group that say they are set up for road cycling, but with all the problems I had with my back last year until I got my new back and latter in the year with my knee because I changed my shoes, if I turn up to a class, how do I know if I have my bike set up right?

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